Dear Jenny

I’m not supposed to post this yet but in light of Amy Bleuel’s death (she committed suicide), I decided I will. This spoken word piece is very close to me. I wrote it one day and while writing it, I was a sobbing mess. It took me days before I know I could read it and do a spoken word video without being an emotional wreck.

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I Miss You

If there is one thing I learned and observed as I suffer from depression is that who I am now is not who I was before. Things change in you when things spiral down hill in your head.

So let me share to you a short spoken word of the many conversations with myself.

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Sesilya

This concept came about one day when me and a group of friends were at the mall and I did something really idiotic also known as me being a scatterbrain. Mind you, I am not really a scatter brain. I’m proud to say I have an organized mind and I don’t tend to lose train of thought or to do things that make people say “huh?”. However, things have changed ever since I started medicating my depression.

Anyway, going back, we were all laughing at the situation. It was really indeed funny and even I found it hilarious. I’ve already accepted the fact that I will be doing shits like this but it’s part of me now. A friend of mine took a pun of my nickname Sese and called me Sesilya or Cecilia in English and he said he would call me that everytime I do something lol-worthy-stupid-mistakes.

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What You Don’t See

Hello and I’m back with another video concept. It’s not a spoken word but it’s something I wanted to do ever since I saw the video in the The Mighty page. The video is about wearing your mental illness on your face and it was called The Inside Out Challenge.

It really caught my attention and I told myself, I HAVE TO DO THIS. I NEED TO DO THIS.

For those curious of what is this challenge all about, go check out the video below.

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How It Looks Like

A lot of people assume a certain look on someone who is depressed or someone suffering from a certain mental illness. They think we constantly look “emo” or sad. Sometimes they don’t know that the one they are interacting with is someone who is suffering from a mental illness.

This is a very common scenario and this prompted me to do a spoken word about it.

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